Universal Basic Income. Don't be condescending, Mike Hosking

I have tried to follow Mr Hoskins simple logic on why an UBI is not a good idea. One of his arguments is that UBI would be squandering the money on (rich) people who do not need it. However, at the same time he condones the fact that people in need shouldn't get anything either. Logic of reverse conclusion obtrudes. This is a fine example of the ultimatum game where Hosking sees himself unfairly treated. Interestingly is he one of those who might not need an UBI.

The bank always wins

It does not matter how bad the situation is. For many people who rent there may be some tough times ahead. While banks allowing a "mortgage holiday" for home owners, the ongoing of rent payments stays within the power of the landlords. As the cut in mortgage payments may seem to free landlords from the burden of paying back their debts it is indeed just a deferral. The interest and rates have yet to be paid in future. One side to the story are the tenants who won't get a break from paying their share and the other is that landlords will be required to pay up as usual. It's just a matter of when. As the landlord may save […]

The omniscience bias: Why the internet spreads superstition

A challenge forces the brain figuratively to leave the comfort zone and enter a terrain of uncertainty. As a result it creates a gap of information to support one’s view on an issue and leaves gaps in the brain’s structure of knowledge. This “uncertainty effect” has been scientifically evaluated in 2006 by the Boston MIT and led to disturbing conclusions: The brain replaces missing information with an inexplicable fright, an “irrational by-product of not knowing — that keeps us from focusing on the possibility of future rewards”. Frankly: People want to know what they are already inclined to believe.